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Indianapolis Employment Law Blog

Have you been wrongfully terminated?

If you have been let go from your place of employment in Indiana and believe that it was an unfair move, you may be right. At the Employment Law Office of John H. Haskin, we will work with you to pinpoint whether or not you have been wrongfully terminated.

First of all, you should be aware of the fact that Indiana is a state of at-will employment. What does this mean for you? Simply put, it's legal for you to be terminated from your job for all but two reasons. However, if you believe your case falls under one of those reasons, you may have been wrongfully terminated. The first is refusing to do something illegal. "Retaliatory discharge" is the act of your employer firing you in response to you refusing to do something illegal, such as making false claims or doctoring books. Your refusal cannot be met with termination.

Are you protected as a whistleblower?

"Will I still have a job after reporting this incident?" It's a question that might plague Indiana workers just like you who have witnessed or been a part of unethical or dangerous business practices before and want to blow the whistle. While hesitation is understandable, there are fortunately systems in place that you can seek refuge in that will offer protection from retaliation.

The United States Department of Labor has a whistleblower protection program, which was put into place exactly because of fears like yours. In a perfect world, no one would have to worry about losing their job because they reported unsatisfactory or dangerous work conditions. Unfortunately, that isn't always the way things pan out. Obviously, you want to protect yourself and your source of income in addition to protecting your life and physical well-being. You should be able to enjoy both while on the job.

Jewelry company subject of serious sexual harassment allegations

As a woman in the workplace, you know that you have to perform at a high level at your job every day. Despite so many advances in our society, women can still be subjected to unfair treatment while on the job. But there is a line that should not be crossed; women should never be subjected to sexual harassment. And if a woman is sexually harassed, she has the right to hold the assailant and even the company she works for accountable.

Recently, the details have emerged about a private class action filed in 2008 in which it is alleged that female employees of Sterling Jewelers faced routine incidents of sexual harassment. In total, the case included 69,000 former and current female Sterling employees.

What qualifies as pregnancy discrimination?

Many Indiana women maintain their current jobs when they are pregnant or have recently delivered a baby. While new or expectant mothers are often given respect from their employers and coworkers, there are also situations in which you may be discriminated against and mistreated. The United States Equal Employment Opportunity Commission has detailed the situations that qualify as pregnancy discrimination.

 

How can I stop the bully at my workplace?

Almost every job has its stresses and challenges. But if you share your workspace with others who treat you fairly and are supportive of your efforts, it is much easier to get through the day. In fact, you may even enjoy going to work if you are in a positive environment. However, your place of employment could seem like a battleground if you are being subjected to bullying tactics on behalf of your supervisors or co-workers.

As amazing as it may seem, there have been no laws passed that deal with bullying in the workplace. But this does not mean that workplace bullies can always get away with acting like they are the rulers of a playground. Sometimes bullies engage in specific behaviors that are illegal. As such, if you are being unfairly targeted for abuse at work, you should carefully note the form the abuse takes.

Former CNN producer files lawsuit after termination

Our dreams provide our motivation. And when properly focused, our efforts can yield amazing results. For example, with hard work and perseverance, you may be able to get the job of your dreams. But unfortunately, sometimes what starts out as the perfect opportunity can be brought unfairly to an end. And very little in life is more painful than being denied opportunities at the workplace or being wrongfully dismissed.

Hidden clauses to watch out for in employment contracts, Part 2

There are advantages to being a contract worker if you are lucky enough to possess the skills that are in high demand in the marketplace. Companies are more than willing to secure the services of top-flight talent in the belief that their investment will yield dividends. And a contracted employee can enjoy the guarantees and perks provided by a written employment agreement.

How can I stop the bully at my workplace?

Almost every job has its stresses and challenges. But if you share your workspace with others who treat you fairly and are supportive of your efforts, it is much easier to get through the day. In fact, you may even enjoy going to work if you are in a positive environment. However, your place of employment could seem like a battleground if you are being subjected to bullying tactics on behalf of your supervisors or co-workers.

Story of harassment at Fox News to become feature film

One of the most stunning aspects of the scandal involving the sexual harassment allegations leveled against former Fox News chairman Roger Ailes is the fact that the women who brought the situation to light were so empowered in their own right. What this tells us is that having status within an organization is not necessarily a buffer against incidents of harassment.

Decorated vet driven off her TSA job for blowing the whistle

"TSA has a saying: If you see something, say something," according to Alyssa, a 33-year-old Bronze Star-awarded soldier who used to work at the agency's headquarters. "Little did I know that when I said something, I would be fighting the agency."

After serving in Iraq, Alyssa left the military in 2011. In 2014 she moved from a contractor position to a full-time employee position with the Transportation Security Agency. She was enthusiastic about working for another Iraq vet, but that enthusiasm didn't last long.

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