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Wage and Hour Laws Archives

Workers paid less than owed may file claim against employer

People in Indiana naturally work hard for their hourly wages or salaries. In fact, many individuals end up working over 40 hours a week just so that they can create better lives for their families and for themselves. Unfortunately, in some cases, they end up not being compensated for all of the hours they have worked and thus get paid less than owed.

Latina woman claims race discrimination by employer

It is unlawful for employers in Indiana and other states to discriminate against their workers on the basis of protected classes, such as gender and race. In one recent case in another state, a woman claimed that the city for which she worked had specifically engaged in race discrimination toward her. She has filed a lawsuit against her employer.

AT&T accused of violating Fair Labor Standards Act by workers

Telecommunications leader AT&T is being accused of wage-and-hour violations by some of its employees. People in Indiana and across the country may be dismayed to hear how the company is allegedly treating its workers. Employees for the company in another state have filed a class-action lawsuit against the giant, alleging that they were not given overtime pay. The affected employees also believe that they were improperly classified, making them ineligible to receive overtime, and the company did not abide by the Fair Labor Standards Act.

Employment laws concerning jury duty

Employees in Indiana who are called to serve on a jury are often worried about how the service will affect their jobs. Although serving on a jury could potentially result in days or weeks away from work, employers are not allowed to retaliate against their employees for serving on a jury. An employer may not lay off an employee, take away the employee's health insurance or penalize the employee for jury duty in any other way.

Getting paid in a timely manner in Indiana

In most states, employers are required to pay workers on a regular basis. In most cases, employers opt to pay workers on a weekly or biweekly schedule. However, it may only be necessary for an employer to give written notice as to when an employee is going to receive his or her paycheck. For those who are classified as independent contractors, the pay schedule is usually negotiated as part of the agreement between the two parties.

Wages for time not worked

Indiana employees may be familiar with work-related issues such as breaks, but they may be less familiar with special cases in which pay may be required for time that does not involve actual work. Some specific situations may be covered by federal law, ensuring that employees are compensated for time that is controlled by an employer even if work is not involved.

Tipped workers and the minimum wage in Indiana

Employers may not have to pay workers who receive tips the federal or state minimum wage. However, this only applies to workers who receive more than $30 a month in tips. In addition, the tipped workers must be given a wage equal to the minimum wage when their wages and tips are put together.

When an employer can make deductions from a paycheck

Workers in Indiana may want to find out when an employer is legally permitted to make deductions from a paycheck. There are some circumstances when an employer can make a deduction, but the employer must let the employee know about the deduction ahead of time. An agreement about the deduction must also be made in writing, and the agreement must be signed by both he employee and the employer.

Can an employer require overtime?

In the state of Indiana, an employer may require that a worker stay late or work additional unscheduled hours. However, an employer may not require workers to work overtime or stay late if it is forbidden by a collective bargaining agreement or any other contract. State law generally does not say how much notice an employee must be given if asked to stay late on a given day.

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