Contending with the loss of a job can be difficult. But your only real option is to take proactive steps that can get you back into the workforce, hopefully with a job as good or better than the one you lost. Previously on this blog, we looked at some of the things you can do if you have been fired and are looking for a new job. This week will add a few more steps you can take to get your career back on track.

After you have updated your resume, it’s time to start looking for new employment opportunities. But it may take a while before you get the job you want. In the meantime, you may want to take on a part-time job or find some other temporary means of bringing money into your household. And while you are doing a part-time gig, you can look in earnest for a permanent job.

However, be aware that taking on a part-time job could affect your unemployment benefits, so check with your unemployment agency to determine your eligibility.

Speaking of your finances, you will need to create a budget that matches your current economic situation. To this end, it is a good idea to eliminate non-essential expenses. Look at the services you are currently paying for and cut those that you can live without.

You also want to avoid increasing your debt any more than necessary, so watch your spending. And if you have debt obligations that you will be unable to meet, contact your creditors and see if they will grant you temporary payment arrangements or even suspend some of your debts.

And as we mentioned in the previous post, if you believe you were unfairly terminated from your previous job, you may want to contact an attorney who handles employee rights cases. An attorney can assess the circumstances of your dismissal. Depending on the evidence the attorney can compile, you may be able to file a wrongful termination suit, which could lead to your receiving compensation for wages that you were unfairly denied. It may even be possible to get your old position back.